Wednesday, November 30, 2005

This Day in History: November 30, 1874

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Winston Churchill is born

On November 30, 1874 Winston Leonard Spencer Churchill, the British statesman, best known as the Prime Minister of the United Kingdom during World War II, was born in Oxfordshire, England. Winston Churchill is generally regarded as one of the most important leaders in British and world history.

Churchill came from a prestigious family with a long history of military service. Churchill joined the British Fourth Hussars after his father died in 1895. During the next five years, he served in India, the Sudan and South Africa where he distinguished himself in several battles. In 1899, he decided to resign his commission in order to concentrate on his literary and political career. His decision to concentrate on his political career served him well, because in 1900 he was elected to Parliament as a Conservative MP from Oldham. In 1904 he switched sides and joined the Liberals, where he served in a number of important posts before being appointed Britain’s First Lord of the Admiralty in 1911. Once he was appointed Britain’s First Lord of the Admiralty, he worked to bring the British navy together to ready for the war he foresaw happening.

In 1915, during the second year of World War I, Churchill was blamed for the Dardanelles and Gallipoli campaigns, and ended up being excluded from the war coalition government. This caused him to resign. Shortly after he decided to volunteer instead and command an infanty battalion in France. However, in 1917, he felt the urge to go back to politics as a cabinet member in the Liberal government of Lloyd George. From 1919-1921 he was secretary of state for war and in 1924 he returned to the Conservative Party where he ended up playing a lead role in the defeat of the General Strike of 1926, two years later. A few years later, when Churchill was out of office, from 1929-2939, he issues unheeded warnings about the threat of German and Japanese aggression.

After the outbreak of World War II in Europe, Churchill was called back to his post as First Lord of the Admiralty and eight months later replaced the ineffectual Neville Chamberlain as prime minister of a new coalition government. In the first year of his administration, Britain stood alone against Nazi Germany, but Churchill promised his country and the world that the British people would "never surrender." He rallied the British people to a resolute resistance and expertly orchestrated Franklin D. Roosevelt and Joseph Stalin into an alliance that eventually crushed the Axis.

In July 1945, 10 weeks after Germany's defeat, his Conservative government suffered an electoral loss against Clement Attlee's Labour Party, and Churchill resigned as prime minister. He became leader of the opposition and in 1951 was again elected prime minister. Two years later, he was knighted by Queen Elizabeth II and awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature for his six-volume historical study of World War II and for his political speeches. In 1955, he retired as prime minister but remained in Parliament until 1964.

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This is the first day, in about a week, where I don’t feel like I am in a daze. I think its because I quit taking cold medicine. Its funny how much better I feel without it. Weird.

So, I have noticed I have gotten a bit more visitors recently, and was hoping that maybe you would leave me a comment, with even just a simple hello. I would love to hear from you, especially if you have suggestions. Thanks!

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Here we have a Churchill & Roosevelt figurine. These figures are supposed to commemorate one of the 20th century’s most memorable meetings, the Casablanca Conference. They make for pretty good conversation pieces, especially if you know the story behind them, as you do know if you just read this blog. (Churchill is on the right and Roosevelt is on the left.)

Tuesday, November 29, 2005

This Day in History: November 29, 1864

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Sand Creek Massacre Takes Place


On November 29, 1864 a band of Colonel John Chivington’s Colorado volunteers kill 150 peaceful Southern Cheyenne Arapahoe Indians in Sand Creek, Colorado.
Some say the reason that this massacre occurred is because of the rooted decade-long conflict for control of the Great Plains of eastern Colorado. Part of the conflict started with the Fort Laramie Treaty of 1851, which guaranteed ownership of the area north of the Arkansas River to the Nebraska border ot the Cheyenne and Arapahoe. By the 1860s, European-Americans had flooded this area in search of gold in the Colorado rocky Mountains, which placed pressure on the resources of the area. By 1861 tensions arose between the new settlers and the Native American. On February 8, 1861, a Cheyenne delegation, led by Black Kettle and some Arapahoe leaders accepted a new settlement agreement with the Federal Government, which ceded most of their land, but secured a 600-sqaure mile reservation and annuity payments. This deal was called the Treaty of Fort Wise. The agreement of this treaty caused a lot of problems with the Cheyenne and Arapahoe tribes because Black Kettle and this other delegates who agreed to this, only represented a small part of the Cheyenne and Arapahoe tribes. Because a lot of them didn’t agree with this agreement, they ended up not accepting it.

Another issue having to do with this, came from that fact that the new reservation given to them, and the federal payments that were promised to them were unable to sustain the tribes. During the Civil War tensions became worse, and violence broke out several times between the European-Americans and the Indians. In June 1864, the Territorial Governor John Evans tired to isolate recalcitrant Native Americans by inviting the “friendly Indians” to camp near military forts in order to receive provisions and protections. Evans also called for volunteers to fill the military void that was left due to the regular army troops that had been sent to help in the Civil War.

In August 1864, Evans met with Black Kettle and several other chiefs to forge a new peace agreement, and all parties left satisfied. Black Kettle moved his band to Fort Lyon, Colorado, where the commanding officer encouraged him to hunt near Sand Creek. In what can only be considered a wicked act of treachery, Chivington moved his troops to the plains, and on November 29, they attacked the unsuspecting tribe, scattering men, women, and children and hunting them down. The casualties reflect the one-sided nature of the fight. Nine of Chivington's men were killed; 150 of Black Kettle's followers were slaughtered, more than half of them women and children. The Colorado volunteers returned and killed the wounded, mutilated the bodies, and set fire to the village.

The atrocities committed by the soldiers were initially praised, but then condemned as the circumstances of the massacre emerged. Chivington resigned from the military and aborted his budding political career. Black Kettle survived and continued his peace efforts. In 1865, his tribe accepted a new reservation in Indian Territory. After this massacre many Native Americans lost trust in all European-Americans efforts of peace with them.
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This was a pretty awful historical event. But its something that really happened, and should be recognized.

I am not very excited for today. I am still not feeling up to par, but have to do a lot today, that I am not excited about. Wish me luck.

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Our Native American products are not necessarily related, but if you are interested in showing Native American pride or for Native American memorabilia looks to these.

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This is a Cigar Store Indian. In the early 17th century, London shopkeepers placed carved wooden "Indians" in front so patrons would know they stocked tobacco from the New World. Ours is hand carved just like the originals from a solid piece of African Acacia. An artist then hand-paints the colorful details. The entire process takes nearly a month to complete.

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We also have this Hand-carved wooden totem pole. This is hand-carved from a solid piece of wood and accented with earthy pigments, and is inspired by the traditional works of Pacific Northwest tribes. According to Indian folk legend, the Eagle watches over your home and the Bear brings strength to your family.

Monday, November 28, 2005

This Day in History: November 28, 1775

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2nd Continental Congress Formally Establishes U.S. Navy

On November 28, 1775 the 2nd Continental Congress formally established the U.S. Navy as well as adopted the first rules for regulation of the “Navy of the United Colonies”. At this time, the US Navy was called the Continental Navy, and was established for the American Revolutionary War. It had about 50 ships during this time, with about 20 warships active.

A modernization program beginning in the 1880s brought the U.S. into the first rank of the world's navies by the beginning of the 20th century. The Navy saw relatively little action during World War I, but in the years before World War II, it grew into a formidable force, which Japan realized would be a threat to their strategic interests. Japan resolved to remedy the situation with a surprise attack in late 1941. The primary goal of this attack on Pearl Harbor was to cripple the Navy in the Pacific Ocean. The action was strategically ineffective, however, and during the next three years of hard fighting, the U.S. Navy grew into the largest and most powerful navy the world had ever seen.

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So Thanksgiving break was okay, except for the fact that being up in the mountains made me SICKER. Saturday, I slept for 15 hours straight, dead to the world, once I got back to San Diego. Not sure how I survived, especially on the drive back to San Diego, but I did.

I am here today, at work, surviving, due to mass amounts of medicine and antibiotics. Hopefully, once my body realizes it is back home in warmer weather, lower pressure, and air that isn’t thin, I will start to do a little better. Wish me luck, seriously.

I hope your Thanksgiving break was better than mine.

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Here we have a Schott U.S. Navy wool peacoat. This is a Melton wool pea coat produced by Schott NYC, which has outfitted our sailors and flyboys since WWII. This has a wool-blend shell and full quilted lining with center vent back. It also has lined, slash pockets to keep your hands warm with inside breast pockets to keeps your valuables and documents safe.

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Next we have this Navy brass belt buckle. It features the hammer and sickle/star and double-fluted anchor.

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Lastly, we have this U.S. Navy military walking stick. This brass-handled walking stick is emblazoned with the US Navy symbol.

Friday, November 25, 2005

This Day in History: November 25, 1973

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Nixon Calls For Sunday Ban On Gasoline Sales

On November 25, 1973 President Richard M. Nixon calls for Sunday ban on gasoline sales in response to the 1973 oil crisis. This proposal was part of a larger plan that Nixon had announced earlier, as a way to achieve more energy self-sufficiency in the United States by 1980.

The 1973 oil crisis began when 11 Arab oil producers increased oil prices and cut back production due to the United State’s support, and other nations, for the Yom Kippur War. Overnight, the gasoline prices practically quadrupled, and the U.S. economy suffered greatly, especially automakers.

The Sunday gasoline ban lasted until the crisis was resolved in March of 1974. Banning gasoline was not the only response to the oil crisis, legislation was also passed to continue and extend the already imposing national speed limit of 55mph. Not only was this continued due the oil crisis, but also because experts had said that by reducing the speed on the highways an estimated 9,000 traffic fatalities per year would be prevented. Because this upset many impatient travelers, legislation was made to allow cars to make right turns at red lights, which was also said to conserve a significant amount of gasoline.

And thankfully, in 1995, the national 55mph speed limit was repealed, and legislation relating to highway speeds now rests in state hands.


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I remember when this happened actually. Well, most people who read this probably do. I am glad that in my driving years I never had to experience this!

Thanksgiving went well for me. I am happy to have the day off, for the most part. Have a good break if you are off today and this weekend!! If not, have a good Thanksgiving weekend, nonetheless.


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Although not a true gas pump, this gas pump liquor dispenser is a pretty cool addition to any bar, and it only costs $45.

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This is also not a true gas pump, but this Route 66 CD cabinet calls back to a time where gas only cost $.49. I wish I was alive then, or rather that was still the price today of gas.

Thursday, November 24, 2005

This Day in History: November 24, 1621

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History of the First Thanksgiving

I am not sure, November 24, 1621 was actually the first Thanksgiving, but I do know that in 1621 the first Thanksgiving occurred. In 1621 the Plymouth colonists and the Wampanoag Indians shared an autumn harvest feast, which is now known as the first Thanksgiving. While cooking methods and table etiquette have changed as the holiday and evolved through the years, the meal is still consumed today with the same spirit of celebration and overindulgence.

The foods that actually appeared on the first harvest feast were a lot different than what we eat today. Historians aren’t sure exactly what was eaten, but they do know the pilgrims were definitely not eating pumpkin pie or mashed potatoes.
The historians do know of two items that were for sure on the menu, these items being venison and wild fowl.

Another difference in how we celebrate our modern Thanksgiving is that our we centered around turkey and vegetables, and the pilgrim’s Thanksgiving was centered around mainly different meats. Vegetables were not available as much when the pilgrims celebrated their first Thanksgiving.

According to History.com the foods that may have been on the menu are:

Seafood: Cod, Eel, Clams, Lobster
Wild Fowl: Wild Turkey, Goose, Duck, Crane, Swan, Partridge, Eagles
Meat: Venison, Seal
Grain: Wheat Flour, Indian Corn
Vegetables: Pumpkin, Peas, Beans, Onions, Lettuce, Radishes, Carrots
Fruit: Plums, Grapes
Nuts: Walnuts, Chestnuts, Acorns
Herbs and Seasonings: Olive Oil, Liverwort, Leeks, Dried Currants, Parsnips

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I am about to leave for my mom’s for Thanksgiving. Wish me luck in traffic!! Have a good Thanksgiving!!!

Wednesday, November 23, 2005

This Day in History: November 23, 1909

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The Wright brothers formed a corporation for the commercial manufacture of their airplanes

On November 23, 1909 the Wright brothers formed a million dollar corporation in order to manufacture their airplanes. This seemed appropriate because not only had they gotten very popular in the past years before this, but they are the ones who are generally credited with the design and construction of the first practical airplane. They are also credited for the first controllable, powered heavier-than-air flight along with many other aviation milestones.

In 1908 and 1909 the Wright brothers made themselves world famous by taking their airplane on tour. Wilbur Wright toured Europe, where he showed the world how the Wright brother’s airplanes worked, and also organized a company to market his plane. While Wilbur was in Europe, Orville Wright showed his airplane to the United States at Fort Myer, Virginia.

On May 14th, 1908 the Wright Brothers made their first two-person flight with a passenger, Charlie Furnas. On September 17, 1908, a person, Thomas Selfridge, became the first person ever to be killed in a powered airplane, due to propeller failure. Orville was flying this plane at the time during military tests at Fort Myer, Virginia and ended up breaking a leg and two ribs.

The Wright Brothers brought great attention to flying by Wilbur's flight around the Statue of Liberty in New York in 1909. Also in 1909, the Wrights won the first US military aviation contract, worth $30,000 when they built a machine that met the requirements of a two-seater, capable of flights of an hour's duration, at an average of 40 miles per hour (64 km/h) and land undamaged. And on November 23, 1909 they began to build Wright Flyers in factories in Dayton and in Germany in order to manufacture their planes.

The Wrights were involved in several patent battles and in 1914 they finally won. Although Wilbur died from typhoid fever in 1912 before they won, which was an event Orville never completely recovered from. Orville sold his interests in the airplane company in 1915 and died thirty-three years later from a heart attack while fixing the doorbell to his home in Oakwood, Ohio. Neither brother married.

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Note: Our website www.sieglers.com is down for the moment, but don’t forget to check out our products later. Thanks for your patience!

I am soo excited for tomorrow. My mom makes the BEST Thanksgiving food. I bet everyone thinks their mom makes the best thanksgiving food though.

So I went to the doctor’s yesterday, FINALLY, after being sick off and on for about a month. She thinks I have a sinus infection, prompted by allergies. Rather, she agreed with me when I said that’s what I thought it was. So now I’m pumped up with medicine, and basically have a pharmacy in my purse. I just have to get better before I go to my mom’s tomorrow, because she lives 6,000 feet above sea level, and that will hurt my sinus’s if I don’t get this better by then. Fat chance, but it would be nice if it was over.

Anyway I will still be updating this blog on thanksgiving and Friday, so don’t forget to check it out!

Happy Thanksgiving!!

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The Enola Gay model plane has been signed by her commander, Paul Tibbets.

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We also have this P-40B Tomahawk which has been signed by ace-pilot and former Tiger, David "Tex" Hill.

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Last we have this Chuck Yeager Bell X-1 model airplane signed by the now-famous Yeager.

Tuesday, November 22, 2005

This Day in History: November 22, 1963

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John F. Kennedy Assasinated

As John Fitzgerald Kennedy, the 35th president of the United States was assassinated while traveling through Dallas, Texas in an open-top convertible on November 22, 1963.

Jacqueline Kennedy, the First Lady, was with him as well as the Texas Governor and his wife, on what was supposed to be a 10-mile motorcade through the streets of downtown Dallas. While they were in their Lincoln convertible, the Kennedy’s and Connally’s waved at the large crowds that gathered around to see them. As their vehicle went past the Texas School Book Depository Building at 12:30pm, Harvey Oswald allegedly fired three shorts at them from the sixth floor. These shots ended up fatally wounding Kennedy, while also injuring Governor Connally. Kennedy died 30 minutes after the shots in Dallas, at Dallas’ Parkland Hospital, at age 46.

Vice President Lyndon Johnson was sworn in as the 36th president of the United States at 2:39 p.m., only 2 hours later after the incident. About 30 people, including Jacqueline Kennedy, who was still wearing clothes stained with her husband’s blood, witnessed the swearing in.

Less than an hour after Kennedy was shot, Oswald killed a policeman who questioned him on the street near his rooming house in Dallas. Thirty minutes later, Oswald was arrested in a movie theater after police had heard reports that he was there. Oswald was formally arraigned on November 23 for the murders of President Kennedy and Officer J.D. Tippit.

On November 24, Oswald was brought to the basement of the Dallas police headquarters to go to a more secure county jail. On his way, a crowd of police and press with live television cameras rolling gathered to witness his departure. As Oswald came into the room, Jack Ruby emerged from the crowd and fatally wounded him with a single shot from a concealed revolver. Ruby was immediately detained and claimed that rage at Kennedy's murder was the motive for his action. Jack Ruby was known to be connected to organized crime and many believe he killed Oswald to keep Oswald from revealing a larger conspiracy.He ended up pleading innocent, claminig that his rage for Kennedy’s murder caused him to suffer “psychomotor epilepsy” which allowed him to shot Oswald unconsciously. The jury didn’t buy this, and found Ruby to be guilty of “murder with malice” and sentenced him to death.

The official Warren Commission report of 1964 concluded that neither Oswald nor Ruby were part of a larger conspiracy, either domestic or international, to assassinate President Kennedy. These findings failed at silencing the conspiracy theories surrounding the event. In 1978 the House Select Committee on Assassinations concluded in a preliminary report that Kennedy was "probably assassinated as a result of a conspiracy" that may have involved multiple shooters and organized crime. The committee's findings, as with those of the Warren Commission, continue to be widely disputed.

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I had talked about Kennedy’s assassination before, and got a lot of feedback from people, who were interested in these conspiracies. I was recommended some great books to read about this. If you are interested, let me know. Also, if you have any other conspiracy theories, please let me know, I find this kind of thing very interesting.
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For Kennedy memorabilia we have Kennedy’s Authentic framed inaugural invitation. A select few received personal invitations to the inauguration of President John F. Kennedy. We have a handful of these historic invitations, each printed on heavy card stock. It even comes with a certificate of authenticity.

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We also have this 1964 JFK silver dollar pocket watch.This pocket watch has JFK’s image intricately embossed on a 90% 1964 JFK silver half-dollar.

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Finally, we have another limited-edition JFK collectible.This features JFK at the helm of the Manitou. Only 500 pieces have ever been made. It also features the rare 1964 Kennedy silver half-dollar and the Eternal Flame JFK stamp, as well as a numbered brass plaque.

Monday, November 21, 2005

This Day in History: November 21, 1877

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Thomas Edison announced his invention of the phonograph

On November 21, 1877 Thomas Edison announced his invention of the phonograph and he demonstrated how his device worked for the first time on November 29. Edison’s first phonographs recorded onto a phonograph cylinder using a vertical motion of the stylus. His early patents of it show that he also was considering the idea that sound could be recorded, on something such as a spiral onto a disc, although he ended up focusing his efforts on cylinders, because the groove on the outside of a rotating cylinder provides a constant velocity to the stylus in the groove, which Edison considered to be more correct, scientifically. His patent stated that he audio recording was embossed, and it wasn’t until 1889 when Bell and Tainter patented the idea of engraved recordings.

The phonograph, otherwise known as a gramophone, was a common device used for playing recorded sounds from 1877 until the 1980s. It is the first device that could record and replay a sound. It was a very innovative invention. Today, the phonograph is known as a turntable or a record player, but in the 19th century and early 20th century, it was called the talking machine.


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So I am pretty happy about this week only being three days. Especially, since I still have allergies and feel sick. I am going to the doctors tomorrow if I can get an appointment, finally. It’s been over a month of me being off and on sick, I should probably take care of it now.

Anyway, hope your weekends went well. Mine went okay. I got two papers done, which was nice. Only two more left in the next two weeks, which is nice. Well, maybe three, we will see.

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Here we have a Portable record player. This portable turntable turns out incredible sound over full-range stereo speakers. It also has adjustable tone control; diamond stylus and plays 33 1/3, 45 and 78 RPM records.


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Next we have a Vinyl record carrying case. This sturdy case comes with corner protectors, a metal snap closure and handle that helps you carry your music wherever you go. It holds and protects 30 albums, with vinyl-wrapped storage and brass hinges.

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This isn’t exactly related, but I think this is really cute décor for people who love records and record players. These are cute really cute Vintage vinyl record coasters that come in a set of four. These coasters are from vintage original label ‘78s. They have a felt backing on the reverse side in order to protect furniture.

Friday, November 18, 2005

This Day in History: November 18, 1883

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Railroads create the first time zones

At noon on November 18, 1883 the American and Canadian Railroads created the first time zones. They created four continental time zones in order to end the confusion of dealing with thousands of local times. But the fact that the railroads prompted such a huge change, showed the great power of the railroad at the time. In the 1880s the rail line that covered North America was having a lot of problems with moving passengers and freight because the railroads began to shrink the travel time between cities from days or months to mere hours. This decrease in time travel caused what came to be known as a scheduling nightmare. Railroad timetables in major cities listed dozens of different arrival and departure times for the same train, and each linked to a different local time zone. There needed to be a more efficient way for railroad transportation, a way that demanded a more uniform time-keeping system. The railroad companies decided to take initiative to create a new time code system by themselves instead of getting the federal government of the United States involved. The companies agreed to divide the continent into four time zones; which are very similar to the dividing lines that we still use today.

Before the railroad companies created the first time zones, the time of day was a local matter, and most cities and towns used some form of local solar time, maintained by some well-known clock, such as the church steeple clock. Not everybody immediately embraced the new standard time system at first, however most Americans and Canadians gave in because the railroads were often their lifeblood and their main link to the rest of the world. It was not until 1918 that Congress officially adopted the time zones with the Act of March 19, 1918, which is often referred to as the Standard Time Act. The act also established daylight saving time.

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It is almost the weekend. And I can’t wait. I haven’t gotten any sleep all week, and it is time to finally get some. Are you doing anything this weekend? I think I am just doing homework, going to judo, and doing the rest of my Christmas shopping. Well, I should be going. Have a good weekend!!!


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Here we have the Railwayman's pocket watch. This watch comes with the famous “winged wheel” logo, with 24-hour markings on the dial. On the back there is an engraved picture of a Russian 4-8-2 steam locomotive with 14 wheels.

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We also have The Canadian Railroad Vintage Print that shows the Canadian on a cross-country scenic dome trip across Canada.

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Finally, we have this Chicago World's Fair Vintage Railroad Print.This print shows you how the railroads used to speed around Lake Michigan to go to the Chicago World’s Fair, in 1933.

Thursday, November 17, 2005

This Day in History: November 17, 1558

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Elizabeth I ascended the English throne, thus beginning the Elizabethan Age.

On November 17, 1558 Elizabeth I ascended the English throne which led to the beginning the Elizabethan Age. Elizabeth I is one of the most popular monarchs in English and British history. Outranking all other British Monarch, Elizabeth I placed seventh in the 100 Great Britons poll, conducted by the British Broadcasting Corporation, in 2002.

Elizabeth was Queen of England and Ireland from November 17th 1558 until her death on March 24th, 1603. Elizabeth was the last monarch of the Tudor dynasty. She reigned during a time of great religious turmoil. The time in which she reigned is often referring to as the Elizabethan Age, or the Golden Age, because it is marked the English Renaissance that provided many changes in English Culture. This brief period of internal peace between the English Reformation and the battles between Protestants and Catholics and the battles between parliament and the monarchy that ended up engulfing the seventeenth century.

During the Elizabethan age, William Shakespeare, Christopher Marlow and Ben Jonson made a significant impact on the culture. Francis Drake did also, when he became the first Englishman to circumnavigate the globe, where he laid out his philosophical and political views to the world. In addition, Sir Walter Raleigh and Sir Humphrey Gilbert had a great influence too through the English colonization of North America.

Elizabeth is noted as a successful monarch, because she helped steady the nation even after inheriting an enormous national debt from her sister Mary. Under her leadership, England managed to avoid a Spanish invasion, and an outbreak of a religious or civil war on English soil.

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There were slight complaints about my "about me" picture, so I changed it. This one, you can see more of me, than pink. Hah.

Anyway, life is alright here. Thursday is the only day during the week where I can sleep past 530am, so I like it.

Does anyone have any plans for the weekend yet? I try to make them advanced, so I don't end up doing nothing. But this weekend I need to do nothing, well fun, because I have a really big paper due on Tuesday. But I think I am going to get some christmas shopping done this weekend, so that would make everything in life feel a little less stressful.

I hope you have a good day, and are enjoying such good weather as we are in San Diego. Where I am, it could hit 81 degrees. Woo hoo!

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We have Queen Elizabeth II's crown jewels, well rather a miniature replica of Queen Elizabeth II’s Crown of St. Edward that is displayed currently in the Tower of London.

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We also have miniature crown of the Queen of Scotland. Each of these miniatures is handcrafted in England under Royal Warrant, and they are an exact 1/12 scale replica of the actual Crown of Scotland in the Tower of London.

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Lastly, we have miniature crown of the Queen Mother. This is an exact 1/12 scale replica of the actual Crown of the Queen Mother in the Tower of London.

Wednesday, November 16, 2005

This Day in History: November 16, 1933

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The United States and the Soviet Union established diplomatic relations.

On November 16, 1933 the United States and the Soviet Union finally established diplomatic relations, when their policy of non-recognition ended under President Franklin D. Roosevelt. I say finally, because the United States was the last major power to establish diplomatic relations with the Soviet Union. When they granted diplomatic recognition to the Soviet Union, the Soviet Union made a pledge to refrain from interfering with any internal affairs in the United States.

The bad relations between the Soviet Union and the United States previously was driven by ideological, political and economic ideals, which caused shifts in power between the superpowers and created bitter rivalry between the two over the years. The United States was hostile to the Soviet Union at first because they took Russia out of World War I and because they were a communist state.

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Sorry if the blog is a little late today, logistical stuff had to come first today. The weather right now in San Diego is still amazing. I was just outside for a few minutes, and it was the PERFECT temperature. I LOVE it.

What’s the weather like where you are from? Anything crazy? Like 85 degree weather in the middle of November?

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If you are interested in Russia or the Soviet Union, check out our KGB badges. These have been marked down to only $7.95 each. These badges are like those awarded to members of the KGB. Each badge says "Honorable worker of the KGB, USSR," in Cyrillic. It is also emblazoned with KGB's sword and shield crest and with hammer and sickle crest of USSR superimposed on a star. The red star is surrounded by a gold wreath and says "CCCP".

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We also have these Soviet ushankas. These ushanka officer hats are new and straight from the military factory in Belarus. This ushanka comes wth earflaps that can pull-down or tied-up. It also comes with an enlisted man’s insignia, and it only costs $39.95.

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We also have unique Soviet-era pins. The themes of the pins include space, aviation, sports, Olympics and Lenin; even some rare city and regional crests.

Tuesday, November 15, 2005

This Day in History: November 15, 1957

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Nikita Khrushchev challenges United States to a missile "shooting match"

On November 15, 1957 Soviet leader Nikita Khrushchev claims that the Soviet Union has missile superiority over the United States and challenges America to a missile "shooting match" to prove his assertion in an interview with an American reporter. This fueled the fears in the United States, that as a nation they were falling dangerously behind the Soviets in the arms race.

In the interview he bragged about Soviet missile superiority, and claimed that the United States did not have intercontinental ballistic rockets. In the interview he said: "If she had [the intercontinental ballistic rockets]," the Russian leader sneered, "she would have launched her own sputnik." After this, he issued a challenge by saying, "Let's have a peaceful rocket contest just like a rifle-shooting match, and they'll see for themselves."

Khrushchev continued to talk talked about the East-West relations, but this time talked about how American and Soviet people both wanted peace. He cautioned, however, that although the Soviet Union would never start a war, "some lunatics" might bring about a conflict. Specifically he noted that Secretary of State John Foster Dulles who had created "an artificial war psychosis." In the case of war, he said, it "would be fought on the American continent, which can be reached by our rockets."

He then went on to say that the NATO forces in Europe would also be devastated if anything happened, and that Europe "might become a veritable cemetery." He also said, while the Soviet Union would "suffer immensely," the forces of communism would ultimately destroy capitalism.

Khrushchev's remarks came just a few days after the Gaither Report had been leaked to the press in the United States. The report supported many of the Russian leader's contentions, charging that the United States was falling far behind the Soviets in the arms race. From here, critics of President Dwight D. Eisenhower's foreign policy, particularly from the Democratic Party, went on the attack. The public debate concerning the alleged "missile gap" between U.S. and Soviet rocket arsenals continued through the early 1960s and was a major issue in the 1960 presidential campaign between Richard Nixon and John F. Kennedy.

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This is the first day I felt okay enough in the morning to go to the gym in almost 2 weeks. I was glad to be back.

Anyway, it’s a busy week again. I have to get all kinds of things done before Thanksgiving. I can’t wait to eat some good food, see the family, and see my really good friend from back home. Hopefully, it won’t snow this year, but by the looks of the weather 2 hours away (in San Diego), it shouldn’t. It is the middle of November, officially, and it is supposed to get up 87 degrees today. I am more than excited for this. You have no idea. I was getting sad because the days started to get shorter, but at least the days keep staying warm.

Well have a good one today! Leave me a comment. Please.

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Related Products

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If you are interested in the Cold War, or just missiles, check out this Cold War tank buster missile. These armor-piercing missiles were built during the Cold War for the M1-A1 Abrams tank (America's primary battle tank). They were dubbed "tank busters" because they were designed to take out heavily armored Warsaw Pact tanks on the European battlefield. Tens of thousands of these missiles were destroyed under the Department of Defense's "crush rule." By some luck and a connection in the Pentagon, we rescued a few practice rounds. Each stands 18" tall and weighs a whopping 8 lbs.! Some are even engraved with the D.O.D.'s item number (GI M-735).

Monday, November 14, 2005

This Day in History: November 14, 1882

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Franklin Leslie kills Billy "The Kid" Claiborne.


On November 14, 1882 the gunslinger Franklin Leslie, known best as "Buckskin" shot the Billy "The Kid" Claiborne dead in Tombstone, Arizona. Billy Claiborne was a western outlaw and a gunfighter who is known to be one of the survivors of the Gunfight at the O.K. Coral. He is said to be either from Arizona or New Mexico Territory. Billy Claiborne made a name for himself when he demanded to be called Billy the Kid after William Bonney’s death in July 1881 (the original Billy the Kid). When he tried to claim this name, three men laughed at him, so he shot all three of them dead. Billy Claiborne was arrested for the death of the Jim Hickey, the third man he shot, and was put in prison in San Pedro, Arizona. He broke out of jail on October 22, 1881 when his friends Ike Clanton, Frank McLaury and Tom McLaury came to his rescue. The Clanton’s helped Billy Claiborne because he had enlisted to confront the Earp’s with them. During the gunfight four days later, Billy Claiborne is said to have fought pretty dirty against Virgil Earp, which ended up ultimately causing his death. After escaping from Tombstone, Billy Claiborne disappeared for a while before returning back. On November 14, 1882, Billy the Kid showed up drunkenly to the Oriental Saloon and demanded Franklin “Buckskin” Leslie call him Billy the kid. Once Billy Claiborne left the saloon, Leslie followed him and started a gunfight, which resulted in Billy Claiborne’s death.

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So, I got back from Long Beach this morning. All I have had this morning is a Red Bull and a hot chocolate, and I am feeling pretty weird. I am glad to be done with traffic though. Instead of the 1.5 hours it takes me to get to San Diego from Long Beach, it took me 2 .5 hours this morning. I guess that isn’t too bad, saying I left during the middle of rush hour traffic, on accident.

In other news, I had a pretty decent weekend. No basketball watching happened as I was hoping, but I did watch Jarhead. Have any of you seen it yet? Did anyone of you go to Desert Storm? Leave me a comment, and let me know. I would be interested in hearing your story!

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This Six-shooter and holster would have looked pretty cool on Billy the Kid. This non-firing six-shooter replica had a 6" barrel with hardwood handgrips and a revolving cylinder with cocking/firing trigger. It is crafted from hand-tooled leather and accented with brass hardware.

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We also have these Brass brothel tokens that were around during Billy’s time. These solid brass tokens are inspired by messages from Ol' West cathouses. I think these things are hilarious.

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We also have this Elegant dueling pistol that is an awesome display piece if you have an interest in the Old West. This is an 18th-century replica, with all-metal construction with antiqued patina.

Friday, November 11, 2005

Siegler & Co Sale

Please tell me if you like these or hate these and I will act accordingly with your wishes to either keep them or get rid of them. Thanks :-)

 
 
British Colonial
brass compass

Was $59.95, Now $49.95
Isle of Lewis
chess set

Was $249.00, Now $229.00
 
 
Weekly Web Special Offer: Sale price for Web Special of the Week valid until midnight 11/17/2005, or while supplies last. Sale price cannot be applied to previous purchases.
 
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